Why are so many tiny homeshippers getting homes?

Tiny homeshipper orders are becoming more common in India, where a growing number of people are renting out their homes for small spaces.

The number of small homeshippies has risen to nearly 70,000 in 2016, according to an industry body, which is a major jump from less than 10,000 people in the early 1990s.

The growth is attributed to two factors: the availability of cheap land and demand for affordable units in India’s booming cities.

The government has been making efforts to promote small homes as a solution to housing shortages, but some experts have questioned whether it is the right solution.

India has a huge number of tiny homes, and many of them are owned by single people, who rent them out to friends and family for short periods of time.

The homes can be very small, often only five or six square feet.

Many of the houses also have a lot of windows and little or no interior space.

“Most of the homes are for the most part rented out to the poor and those who have no money,” said Aishwarya, a real estate agent in a slum in central Mumbai.

“People who have been on the dole or in the labour market are renting these tiny houses.

The housing shortage is very acute.”

The number is rising fast.

According to data from the Indian Institute of Technology, about 10,600 homes in India are currently owned by families.

While a number of homes are still owned by landlords, a majority of the properties are rented to households or small groups of people who are working.

These groups are called micro-rentals, because they do not have any owner and are not connected to any landlords.

“Many of these are owned through tiny-home groups and rented out by them to people who do not even have a house,” said Kailash Singh, an analyst with the research and advisory firm Technomic.

“They have no access to money or credit.

They have no job, no savings, and no job prospects.”

“We have a huge problem in India with housing shortage,” said Vijay, a micro-rental entrepreneur.

“It is so severe, it is affecting every aspect of people’s lives.”

Micro-rental operators often rent out apartments to people living in slums and villages, where there are few amenities and access to affordable housing is difficult.

But it is difficult to find apartments in slum areas that are small enough to rent out for short term stays.

Even if a micro rental does rent out a house, the owners often find it hard to afford it, as they usually have to work in order to make ends meet.

“There are many small rentals that are renting apartments in residential areas for just a few months or even a few years, but these units are always rented out for one-week periods,” said Rajeev, who runs a micro market called the Misericordia.

“We find that the micro rental is in very bad shape, it’s in a terrible state, and there are a lot who have not even been able to pay rent on the apartment.”

According to a 2016 study by the Indian Centre for Development Studies, the country has more than 3 million micro-units, a number that has grown every year since 2011.

Many micro-market owners rent out units that are smaller than six square meters.

“For micro-mall owners, the rental period is very short and often the rent is only two months’ rent,” said Vimal, who owns a micro business in a tiny apartment in south Mumbai.

Micro-malls in the city, which has about 10 million inhabitants, are the main source of micro-housing for people living on the streets.

“The owners of micro markets are making the money from their small properties by selling them for a fixed rent,” added Vijay.

Many small rental properties are often poorly run.

The owners often lease the property to people without any means of support.

“When you rent a house or apartment, the owner does not know what to do with the property,” said Raman, a 20-year-old micro-lender in a residential complex in north Mumbai.

People living in micro-markets often struggle to find affordable housing, and their properties often go unused.

They often do not rent out space, leaving it vacant for months on end.

Some people in India live in rented apartments, while others live in micro apartments.

Some micro-home owners rent their homes to small groups for short stays, while other owners rent them for the duration of the tenants’ stay.

Many people in Mumbai, for instance, rent out their apartments to families, friends, and neighbours for a few weeks at a time, said Anurag, a small-business owner who lives in a housing complex in Mumbai’s central Malabar neighbourhood.

“Our micro-businesses have more than 50 micro-unit